Why I left Facebook

Speak my friend, you look surprised
I thought you knew I’d come disguised
On angel wings, dressed in white
From Descent of the Archangel by Kamelot

Last week I finally had enough. The cumulative effect of every sleazy privacy invading stunt that Mssrs. Zuckerberg et al have pulled was definitely part of the motivation. Also the recent departure of several of security blogger “friends” including Richard Stiennon was another part. That, and the reality that I’m already following all of my blogger “friend’s” blogs so Facebook was like a cheesy notification service of new blog entries which is not only redundant  as news aggregators do a much better job, but includes tons of advertising  which I was compelled to filter.

Then there was the simple fact that Facebook is a an incredible time sink [read waste of time]. When I realized that the last two entries in this blog were Captain X-Ploit sagas – and the good captain doesn’t appear that often – it became clear that some priorities were seriously amiss. There were some mitigating factors of course not the least of which is that I work for a company that builds actual products for actual customers and the particular actual product that I’m working on is getting close to release [disclaimer: this is not a product announcement since I have nothing to do with that kind of stuff and is not meant to imply or represent anything about Ricoh products] which means plenty of work and deadlines. And the fact that I spent any time on Facebook is hard to justify.

And then there was a post that was forwarding and reposting it’s way among my less technically savvy (or possibly delusional) “friends” that went like this.

Who says Facebook friends aren’t real friends?.. They enjoy seeing you on line everyday. Miss you when you’re not there. Send condolences when you lose a loved one. Send you wishes on your birthday. Enjoy the photos you post. Put a smile on your face when you’re down. Make you laugh when you feel like crying. Repost if you are grateful for your Facebook friends. I know I am.

Seriously? Come on folks – a Facebook “friend” is an online persona. They are NOT REAL PEOPLE. You may buy into the abstraction that your “friends” represent real people, but I for one have always been very open about the fact that my Facebook profile was completely fraudulent. This was to help mitigate the privacy infringing business model of Facebook. If you really don’t mind letting Facebook have it’s way “monetizing” your personal information with no compensation to you I guess that’s your choice. Sucker.

And then there’s the legal exposure. Yeah that’s right. Legal exposure. Here’s an example from the Electronic Discovery Law blog.

In this case arising from a car accident which the plaintiff claimed resulted in physical and psychological injuries, the parties invited the court to conduct a review of Plaintiff’s social networking accounts “in order to determine whether certain information contained within Plaintiff’s accounts is properly subject to discovery.” Using Plaintiff’s log-in information, the court reviewed Plaintiff’s Facebook account, including “a thorough review of Plaintiff’s ‘Profile’ postings, photographs, and other information.”

But the thing that finally caused me to bail from Facebook was the realization that the Facebook – and nearly all social networking sites’ – business model is fundamentally flawed. This is articulated quite nicely in this article by Bob Garfield in IEEE Spectrum entitled The Revolution Will Not Be Monetized.

1. If you build it and they come, does that guarantee that there’s money to be made? (Hint: No.)

2. Which of Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter will amass the millennium’s first megafortune and a borderless virtual state, with a vast population, political influence, economic clout, and a lair in a hollowed-out volcano from which to control the world’s weather? (Well, you can probably eliminate Twitter.)

3. The Wall Street valuations of companies like Facebook, which is worth US $85 billion on the secondary market, are stratospheric. Should we stockpile ammo and canned goods for when the bubble bursts? (Not a bad idea; remember Pets.com.)

According to the Interactive Advertising Bureau, U.S. advertisers spent $25 billion online in 2010—representing about 15 percent of the $164 billion U.S. ad market and, for the first time, a bit more than their spending on print newspapers. That was no small milestone. But here’s the thing: According to eMarketer, 31 percent of Americans’ media-consuming time in 2010 was spent online. Which means, speaking broadly, marketers valued new-media time only half as much as old-media time. And that’s the rose-colored view. Chris Anderson, curator of the TED Conferences, recently crunched numbers from Nielsen, Forrester Research, the Yankee Group, and other modelers to synthesize the value, medium by medium, of an individual’s time. Globally, print publications fetched $1 per hour of reader attention. TV got a quarter for a viewer hour. Online fetched “less than a dime.”

Why is online advertising such a poor stepchild? Well, extremely delightful and informative books with pale-blue and white covers have been written on this subject, but let’s reduce the problem to its essence: The endless supply of online content means an endless supply of places where ads could go, which by definition depresses demand and, with it, price. Period.

The second problem is more basic still. Ever click on a banner ad? Have you? Ever? Of course not, because why would you leave what you’re doing—especially socializing—to go listen to a sales pitch? The click-through rate, industry-wide, is less than 1 percent—and chalk some of that up to mouse error and click fraud. Some advertisers deal with this problem by popping ads into your face, blaring audio, or subjecting you to “preroll” video messages before the video you actually wish to see. As Anderson sagely observed to a Madison Avenue audience, that was an acceptable quid pro quo in the days of passive TV viewing. Online, though, users are active and in control. “If you take control away from them,” he said, “they will hate you.” Or, put another way: Online, all advertising is spam. These two structural problems leave two possibilities: Either advertising will never be the force in new media that it was in the five predigital centuries (a theory to which I personally subscribe), or someone will crack the code.

Yep. That pretty much covers it. When you are a Facebook “member” [read product] you are essentially trading your privacy for Facebook to convince advertisers that they can target you with spam better than their competitors. It’s not even as clever as Google’s for-fee search engine poisoning (er… Search Engine Optimization) and a whole lot more intrusive.

So there you have it. I really doubt that I will be missed on Facebook. Certainly not by Facebook themselves since I never provided them with any private information and probably not by any “friends” [read online personae that I found amusing] since those who matter in any real way can either call me or find me at this blog. All the others will probably find it refreshing to not be mocked with snarky comments when they post silly nonsense on their walls. And fear not, this blog is still represented on Facebook through the intrepid David Nicholas Stone, AKA Captain X-Ploit. Feel free to become a fan.

Oh – and to my “friend” Mark Zuckerberg - Take the money and run dude! It will get ugly when the investors sober up.

One thought on “Why I left Facebook

  1. Pingback: Why are you still at Facebook? « Security For All

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